loses

Huawei’s Meng Wanzhou loses key decision in extradition case

NEW YORK — A Canadian judge on Wednesday ruled that the extradition trial of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer, will move on to the next stage as the premise of the extradition request — “double criminality” — is met.

“On the question of law posed, I conclude that, as a matter of law, the double criminality requirement for extradition is capable of being met in this case. The effects of the U.S. sanctions may properly play a role in the double criminality analysis as part of the background or context against which the alleged conduct is examined,” wrote Associate

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Huawei executive loses key decision in extradition case

NEW YORK — A Canadian judge on Wednesday ruled that Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou’s extradition trial will move on to the next stage as the premise of the extradition request — “double criminality” — is met.

“On the question of law posed, I conclude that, as a matter of law, the double criminality requirement for extradition is capable of being met in this case. The effects of the U.S. sanctions may properly play a role in the double criminality analysis as part of the background or context against which the alleged conduct is examined,” wrote Associate Chief Justice Heather Holmes

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As ‘bat woman’ lab loses funds, critics say US politics trump science

TOKYO — The news was sudden, and stunning. The premier U.S. agency for biomedical research cut funding last month to a New York-based lab that works with researchers worldwide on infectious diseases, and the motivation appeared to be political rather than scientific.

The National Institutes of Health severed the funding for the EcoHealth Alliance roughly one week after President Donald Trump was asked about the nonprofit’s link to a lab in the Chinese city of Wuhan where the novel coronavirus is claimed to have originated. There had been American media reports about the lab and the U.S. funding it receives.

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Komatsu loses ground to Sany, missing out on China construction boom

TOKYO/BEIJING — Japan’s Komatsu, once China’s leading supplier of construction equipment, has failed to catch the wave of infrastructure projects aimed at stimulating the country’s post-coronavirus economy, losing out to top local rival Sany Heavy Industry.

“Customers come to the factory to take completed excavators,” said a representative at a Sany group plant in Shanghai that is running at full capacity and expanding production capacity.

Excavator sales nationwide soared 65% in April to 43,000 units, data from the China Construction Machinery Association shows, reaching an all-time high for the month.

Demand remains strong despite Sany and other competitors raising prices

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